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Franklin County Emergency Services
55 Bare Hill Road
Malone, NY  12953

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518-483-2580

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     Welcome to Franklin County Emergency Services website...

This site is intended to provide information on events, activities, training and safety to the Fire and EMS community in Franklin County. Please forward any site content ideas or information including any department events you would like to place on the calendar to Car 2 at the Office of Emergency Services.

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Five Safety Tips for Deep Frying Turkey

Deep Fry Turkey

Fried turkeys are delicious, but they come with a slew of safety issues. Thousands of fires as well as many deaths and injuries happen each year due to turkey fryer fires. Before you set up your turkey fryer this Thanksgiving, remember these safety tips.

Get the Tips

  1. Stay Away from The House – Set up the turkey fryer more than 10 feet away from your home and keep children and pets away. Never leave it unattended.

  2. Find Flat Ground – The oil must be even and steady at all times to ensure safety. Place the fryer on a flat, level surface and carefully gauge the amount of oil needed.

  3. Use a Thawed and Dry Turkey – Make sure your Thanksgiving turkey is completely thawed and dry. Extra water will cause the oil to bubble furiously and spill over. If oil spills from the fryer onto the burner, it can cause a fire.

  4. Monitor the Temp – Use caution when touching the turkey fryer. The lid and handle can become very hot and could cause burns. Also be sure to keep track of the oil’s temperature as many fryers do not have their own thermostats.

  5. Be Prepared – Have a fire extinguisher (multipurpose, dry-powder) ready at all times in the event that the oil ignites.

Downed power lines and safety after a storm

Report downed power lines to 911

In the aftermath of a major storm, be aware of hazards presented by downed power lines. If you see a power line on the ground, don't assume that it is not energized or that it is insulated. Stay at least 10 feet away from the wire and secure the area to keep others away, too. If you discover a low or fallen line, do the following:

  • Consider all wires ENERGIZED and dangerous. Even lines that are de-energized could become energized at any time. Observe the minimum approach distance of 10 feet. A live wire touching the ground can cause electricity to travel through the ground, radiating outward from the contact point. STAY CLEAR!
  • DO NOT attempt to remove a tree limb or other object from a power line. Electricity can travel through limbs, especially when they are wet. When cleaning up after the storm, make absolutely sure that no power lines are near before cutting or trimming damaged trees and removing debris from your property.
  • If a broken power line should fall on your vehicle, stay inside the vehicle. Use your cell phone to call for help. The vehicle can become energized; you are safer remaining inside until help arrives. Metal objects like fences and guardrails can also become energized if a downed power line contacts them. Warn others not to approach or touch the vehicle, and have them call for help.
  • If you MUST get out of the vehicle because of fire or other life-threatening hazards, jump clear of the vehicle so that you do not touch any part of it and the ground at the same time. Jump as far as possible away from the vehicle with both feet landing on the ground at the same time. Once you clear the vehicle, shuffle away, with both feet on the ground, or hop away, with both feet landing on the ground at the same time. Do not run away from the vehicle as the electricity forms rings of different voltages. Running may cause your legs to "bridge" current from a higher ring to a lower voltage ring. This could result in a shock. Get a safe distance away.
  • If someone makes contact with a downed power line, don't try to rescue them because you risk becoming a victim yourself. Call 911 for help.

 

 

Power Lines: Frequently Asked Safety Questions

To help protect you from storm-related electrical hazards:

What should I do if I encounter a downed power line?
If you see a downed power line, move at least 10 feet away from the line and anything touching it. The human body is a ready conductor of electricity.

The proper way to move away from the line is to shuffle away with small steps, keeping your feet together and on the ground at all times. This will minimize the potential for a strong electric shock. Electricity wants to move from a high voltage zone to a low voltage zone—and it could do that through your body.

What can I do to help someone who has come in contact with a downed power line?
If you see someone who is in direct or indirect contact with the downed line, do not touch the person. You could become the next victim. Call 911 instead.

Can I use something that is not metal to try to move a downed power line myself?
Do not attempt to move a downed power line or anything in contact with the line by using another object such as a broom or stick. Even non-conductive materials like wood or cloth, if slightly wet, can conduct electricity and then electrocute you.

What should I do if I see a downed power line in the street while I am driving my car?
Do not drive over downed power lines.

What if a power line comes down onto my car or I didn’t see it until I’ve driven into it?
If you are in your car and it is in contact with the downed line, stay in your car. Tell others to stay away from your vehicle.

If you must leave your car because it’s on fire, jump out of the vehicle with both feet together and avoid contact with the live car and the ground at the same time. This way you avoid being the path of electricity from the car to the earth. Shuffle away from the car.

Is a downed power line still dangerous if it has come down in water, like a pool or pond?
Water is a good conductor of electricity. Any amount of water – even a puddle – could become energized. Be careful not to touch water – or anything in contact with the water - near where there is a downed power line.






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  Ricky Provost

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  John Bashaw II

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